Help Your Pets Live Longer With Good Dental Care

If we could wave a magic wand, we’d make all cats and dogs brush their teeth before bed every night. Why? Because regular dental care is one of the top things we can do to help our pets live longer.

dog with toothbrushAnimals build up tartar, develop gingivitis, and get rotten teeth just like people do; and that leads to debilitating and often expensive health conditions, especially in older pets. Prevention is totally do-able and has two parts.

1. Schedule periodic cleanings at your vet’s office. This is key because ONLY trained professionals can clean under the gum line and handle serious dental situations like tooth removal. We know it’s not cheap. But it’s so important you don’t want to put it off either. Fortunately, February is National Pet Dental month and many clinics offer discounts during that time. So talk to your vet about what schedule is appropriate for your pet and start budgeting for it.

2. Make regular maintenance part of your pet’s routine. That’s where good products make things easier. Visit us for a wide selection of chews, gels, water additives, and other items to reduce tartar and keep teeth in good condition. If you want to learn how to teach your dog to actually enjoy tooth brushing, watch this 6 minute step-by-step YouTube video from Vancouver dog trainer Donna Hill.

Cheap Shots Mobile Vaccine Clinic Every Month

mobile vaccine clinic

The Cheap Shots mobile vaccine clinic team in action.

Does your pet need a vaccine updated? The Cheap Shots mobile vaccine clinic visits our store on the third Saturday of each month from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Their affordable, high quality service is veterinarian-supervised, and they have been serving the bay area for over a decade. So bring your pet(s) by for a vaccine update, or stop in to meet the nice animal-loving folks who staff the mobile clinic. They’re happy to answer any questions you may have. Visit the Cheap Shots website to learn more about their fees and services. To find out exactly which Saturday the clinic is scheduled for each month, ask our staff or sign up for our short & sweet monthly newsletter the next time you visit our store.

In Praise of Senior Pets

November is national Adopt-a-Senior-Pet Month, and there are many good reasons to consider a more “mature” pet for your family if you’re looking to add one. If you already have a senior dog or cat in your life, here’s some excellent resources to help you support the more mature members of your furry householdold dog pic:
Muttville Senior Dog Rescue’s Resource Page
The Grey Muzzle’s Health & Wellness Page
The Senior Dogs Project’s FAQ Page
Cat Behavior Associates Senior Cat Page
American Association of Feline Practitioners Senior Cat Page

Holiday Safety Hazards for Pets

The holidays are fun, even for pets, but the season brings added risks for our four-legged family members. Learn to recognize and manage holiday hazards to keep your pet safe throughout the festivities.

Tinsel

Tinsel is attractive, especially to cats. Tinsel is not toxic but consuming tinsel can cause serious harm to your pet’s digestive system. The long, tough strands can actually cut through the intestine and cause peritonitis.

Ornaments

Pets love to play with bright, colorful ornaments, but may end up breaking or even chewing and swallowing these fragile decorations. Sharp, broken pieces can lacerate the animal’s mouth,christmas-pet-safety-tips throat, and digestive tract. Larger pieces can cause an obstruction and emergency surgery may be needed.

Christmas Trees

Cats love to climb trees, especially when the tree is indoors and loaded with ornaments and other decorations that look a lot like cat toys. A climbing cat can pull a fully decorated Christmas tree crashing to the ground, potentially injuring the animal. Tree water may contain dangerous fertilizers and stagnant tree water may contain unhealthy bacteria, which is dangerous to both dogs and cats.

Mistletoe and Holly

Consuming holly may cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Eating mistletoe can result in stomach upset and even heart problems. A cat may suffer kidney failure after ingesting some types of lilies.

Chocolate

A dog or cat that eats chocolate may experience vomiting and diarrhea, panting, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, seizures and, in severe cases, even death. The darker the chocolate, the more toxic compounds it contains.

Dough

Consuming raw bread dough is dangerous for pets, as heat from the animal’s body causes the dough to rise inside its stomach. The pet may experience vomiting, severe abdominal pain and bloating.

I Think My Pet Ate It! Now What?

If your pet has encountered or ingested one of these holiday hazards, contact your veterinarian without delay. Make this holiday season merry for everyone by keeping your animal companions safe from these potential holiday hazards.

Sources:

ASPCA, “Holiday Safety Tips.” 2014.

Pet Poison HelpLine, “Winter Holiday Pet Poison Tips.” 2014

 

 

 

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